Women in Conservation

Rachel Carson Field Internship

Giving young women the opportunity to develop skills in habitat stewardship & wildlife management.
Least Tern Photo: Ethan Slattery
Women in Conservation

Rachel Carson Field Internship

Giving young women the opportunity to develop skills in habitat stewardship & wildlife management.

In the late 1920s, when Rachel Carson attended Chatham College, then Pennsylvania Female College, her majoring in Biology and her intent to seek a profession in the field was pioneering. A few years later, Rachel Carson had a work experience that changed her life when she spent a summer interning at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod. This experience brought Carson out of the classroom and onto the rocks and shoreline of her beloved Atlantic Coast advancing her from student to bona fide scientist. This experience, along with her literary genius, changed the course of her life and the course of history. At Audubon, we are committed to sound science and conservation and our Women in Conservation Program is working to provide field opportunities to young women who are eager, like Rachel Carson, for hands on experience.

In 2012, Audubon New York established the Rachel Carson Field Internship to give young women the opportunity to develop habitat stewardship and wildlife management skills through on-the-ground field experience. Our field interns work tirelessly on vital bird conservation projects across Long Island helping to save one of the world’s most beloved and endangered birds - the Piping Plover. The Piping Plover population has diminished to only 8,000 birds, 10% of which rely on New York and Long Island for breeding and nesting. The Rachel Carson Field intern assists in bird stewardship and monitoring and public outreach throughout the height of the breeding season. Since our internship was established, our bird conservation program has been able to steward more birds at more sites than ever before.

Participants in the Field Intern Program

2015


Emma Carpenter
SUNY ESFBachelor's degree in Wildlife Science





 


Suzanne Jensen
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and ForestryB.S. in Conservation Biology




 

2014

Emma Carpenter
SUNY ESFBachelor's degree in Wildlife Science







 

2013

Ingrid Brofman
University of New Hampshire, Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Ecology





 

Rachel Neville
Cornell University, Bachelor of Science in the Science of Natural and Environmental Systems