Climate

Birds are telling us it's time to act on climate

Yellow Warbler. Photo: Brian Collier/Audubon Photography Awards

Birds can’t fight climate change. We can.

The fate of birds and humans are deeply connected. Their presence, or absence, gives us important information about the health of the places we live. They are nature's canary in the coalmine, and if an ecosystem is broken for birds, it is or will soon be for people too.

Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink

Audubon’s new science shows that two-thirds (389 out of 604 studied) of North American bird species are at risk of extinction from climate change. The good news is that science also shows we can help improve the chances for 76% of species at risk if we act now.

Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink
Climate

Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink

Audubon’s new science shows that 389 out of 604 of North American bird species are at risk of extinction from climate change.

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State Brief: Birds and Climate in New York
Climate

State Brief: Birds and Climate in New York

Take an in-depth look at the climate change projections for our state.

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New Audubon Science: Two-Thirds of North American Birds at Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change
Climate

New Audubon Science: Two-Thirds of North American Birds at Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change

Enter your zip code into Audubon’s Birds and Climate Visualizer and it will show you how climate change will impact your birds and your community and includes ways you can help.

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It's a bird emergency, but there is hope if we take action.

We are on a dangerous path, but we have the power to chart a better one. It's time to mobilize at our state and federal levels. With your support, we’re bringing science and policy together to chart a better path statewide.

We urge our lawmakers to:

  • Support the implementation of the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act (CLCPA).

  • Develop legislation and policies that support our coastal communities, which will be the first to feel the impacts of climate change.

  • Support the development of responsibly-sited and operated renewable and clean energy (wind and solar) in our communities. At the same time, we must support upgrades and expansions to our electrical transmission infrastructure to reduce the amount of carbon released in to the atmosphere.

On the ground, we must:

  • Restore and manage thousands of acres of tidal marshes to help protect our communities in the face of sea level rise and more powerful storms.
  • Grow and manage millions more acres of diverse, healthy woodlands. Our northeast forests must be more resilient to the stressors of climate change so they can provide essential ecosystem services like carbon sequestration, flood control, and watershed protection. 

Take action via any or all of our initiatives below, and click here to join our network. You'll be the first to hear about opportunities to help birds in your area or nationwide.

Advocacy
Advocacy

Advocacy

We work with lawmakers at the local, state, and federal level to pass effective conservation policies and legislation.

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Take Action!
Advocacy

Take Action!

Want to do more to protect birds? Lend your voice – and more – here.

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Donate Today
Ways To Help

Donate Today

Your support helps us give birds a fighting chance.

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Climate-threatened Species in New York

Climate News & Updates

Statement from Audubon New York on the Accelerated Renewable Energy Growth and Community Benefit Act
Advocacy

Statement from Audubon New York on the Accelerated Renewable Energy Growth and Community Benefit Act

The Governor's proposal includes measures to protect threatened and endangered species.

These Beloved Warblers Migrate North Almost a Week Earlier Than 50 Years Ago
Climate

These Beloved Warblers Migrate North Almost a Week Earlier Than 50 Years Ago

Black-throated Blue Warblers now start spring migration 5.5 days sooner than they did in the 1960s, a new study finds. Is climate change to blame?

WATCH: Audubon's Newest Climate Report
Climate

WATCH: Audubon's Newest Climate Report

Expert staff from Audubon Connecticut and Audubon New York delve into Audubon's latest climate report, Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink.

Audubon Receives Grants to Make Our Coasts More Resilient to Climate Change
Climate

Audubon Receives Grants to Make Our Coasts More Resilient to Climate Change

Projects in North Carolina, New York and California will improve coastal wetlands for birds and people.

Canary in the Coalmine: Impact of Climate Change on Birds
News

Canary in the Coalmine: Impact of Climate Change on Birds

By following birds, we learn about the greatest threats they and our communities face. And we find ways to address them.

New Audubon Science: Two-Thirds of North American Birds at Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change
Climate

New Audubon Science: Two-Thirds of North American Birds at Risk of Extinction Due to Climate Change

Enter your zip code into Audubon’s Birds and Climate Visualizer and it will show you how climate change will impact your birds and your community and includes ways you can help.

Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink
Climate

Survival by Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink

Audubon’s new science shows that 389 out of 604 of North American bird species are at risk of extinction from climate change.

Birds Are Telling Us It's Time to Take Action on Climate
Climate

Birds Are Telling Us It's Time to Take Action on Climate

Global warming poses an existential threat to two-thirds of North American bird species—but there's still time to protect them. Audubon's new climate report says we have to act now.

Five Climate-Threatened Birds and How You Can Help Them
Climate

Five Climate-Threatened Birds and How You Can Help Them

Audubon's newest climate report projects the future ranges for more than 604 North American species.

State Brief: Birds and Climate in New York
Climate

State Brief: Birds and Climate in New York

Take an in-depth look at the climate change projections for our state.